Thursday, February 21, 2019

(1786) Less famous Japanese blades


They are called "nigiri hasami" (握り鋏) that is, "grip scissors" or "tsume-gata hasami"(爪型鋏), "nail-shaped scissors" or "ito-giri hasami"(糸切り鋏), "thread scissors because this is what they are mostly used for but perhaps the most fitting name is "wa hasami" (和はさみ), or "Japanese style scissors". Often still handmade, they are still used a lot in Japan even though they have been abandoned in the rest of the world. And rightfully so because they transmit on the blades even the slightest movement of the hand, which makes them very good for precision cuts. 


(For a bigger version of this picture both in color and black and white, check my "Japan Arekore" set on Flickr)


(1786) Λιγότερο διάσημες ιαπωνικές λεπίδες


Τα λένε "νιγίρι χασάμι" (握り鋏) δηλαδή "ψαλίδια που τα σφίγγεις" ή "τσούμε-γκάτα χασάμι" (爪型鋏), "ψαλίδια σε σχήμα νυχιού" ή "ίτο-γκίρι χασάμι" (糸切り鋏) δηλαδή "ψαλίδια για να κόβεις κλωστές" επειδή αυτή είναι η συνηθέστερη χρήση τους, όμως ίσως τους ταιριάζει περισσότερο το "ουά-χασάμι" (和はさみ) δηλαδή "ιαπωνικού στιλ ψαλίδια". Συχνά ακόμα χειροποίητα, εξακολουθούν να χρησιμοποιούνται πολύ στην Ιαπωνία παρότι έχουν καταργηθεί σχδόν οπουδήποτε αλλού στον κόσμο. Και δικαίως καθώς μεταφέρουν στις λεπίδες ακόμα και την πιο μικρή κίνηση του χεριού, πράγμα που τα κάνει πολύ καλά για κοψίματα ακριβείας. 

 (Για την ίδια φωτογραφία σε μεγαλύτερο μέγεθος και σε μαυρόασπρη εκδοχή, δείτε το σετ «Japan Arekore» στο Flickr).

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

(1785) Japanese to the bone...


...and more specifically to the eel's bone, which, from what we find out, has plenty of calcium and vitamins A, B2, D and E.  

(For a bigger version of this picture both in color and black and white, check my "Japan Arekore" set on Flickr)